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  *  Mythology in Ancient Egypt  *  

Ancient Egyptian Religion
 
Egyptian Creation Myths
 
 
 
        
 
Ancient Egyptian Religion - was a complex system of beliefs and rituals which were an integral part of ancient Egyptian society. It centered on the Egyptians' interaction with a multitude of deities who were believed to be present in, and in control of, the forces and elements of nature. The myths about these gods were meant to explain the origins and behavior of the forces they represented, and the practices of Egyptian religion were efforts to provide for the gods and gain their favor.
 
Formal religious practice centered on the pharaoh, the king of Egypt. Although he was a human, the pharaoh was believed to be descended from the gods. He acted as the intermediary between his people and the gods, and was obligated to sustain the gods through rituals and offerings so that they could maintain order in the universe. Therefore, the state dedicated enormous resources to the performance of these rituals and to the construction of the temples where they were carried out. Individuals could also interact with the gods for their own purposes, appealing for their help through prayer or compelling them to act through magic. These popular religious practices were distinct from, but closely linked with, the formal rituals and institutions. The popular religious tradition grew more prominent in the course of Egyptian history as the status of the pharaoh declined.
 
Another important aspect of the religion was the belief in the afterlife and funerarypractices.
The Egyptians made great efforts to ensure the survival of their souls after death, providing tombs,
grave goods, and offerings to preserve the bodies and spirits of the deceased.
 
The religion had its roots in Egypt's prehistory, and lasted for more than 3,000 years. The details of religious belief changed over time as the importance of particular gods rose and declined, and their intricate relationships shifted. At various times certain gods became preeminent over the others, including the sun god Ra, the creator god Amun, and the mother goddess Isis. For a brief period, in the aberrant theology promulgated by the pharaoh Akhenaten, a single god, the Aten, replaced the traditional pantheon. Yet the overall system endured, even through several periods of foreign rule, until the coming of Christianity in the early centuries AD. It left behind numerous religious writings and monuments, along with significant influences on cultures both ancient and modern
 
 
    
 
 
Egyptian myths - were metaphorical stories intended to illustrate and explain the gods' actions and roles in nature.
The details of the events they recounted could change as long as they conveyed the same symbolic meaning, so many myths exist in different and conflicting versions. Mythical narratives were rarely written in full, and more often texts only contain episodes from or allusions to a larger myth. Knowledge of Egyptian mythology, therefore, is derived mostly from hymns that detail the roles of specific deities, from ritual and magical texts which describe actions related to mythic events, and from funerary texts which mention the roles of many deities in the afterlife. Some information is also provided by allusions in secular texts. Finally, Greeks and Romans such as Plutarch recorded some of the extant myths late in Egyptian history.
 
Among the significant Egyptian myths were the creation myths. According to these stories, the world emerged as a dry space in the primordial ocean of chaos. Because the sun is essential to life on earth, the first rising of Ra marked the moment of this emergence. Different forms of the myth describe the process of creation in various ways: a transformation of the primordial god Atum into the elements that form the world, as the creative speech of the intellectual god Ptah, and as an act of the hidden power of Amun. Regardless of these variations, the act of creation represented the initial establishment
of maat and the pattern for the subsequent cycles of time.
 
The most important of all Egyptian myths was the myth of Osiris and Isis. It tells of the divine ruler Osiris, who was murdered by his jealous brother Set, a god often associated with chaos. Osiris' sister and wife Isis resurrected him so that he could conceive an heir, Horus. Osiris then entered the underworld and became the ruler of the dead. Once grown, Horus fought and defeated Set to become king himself. Set's association with chaos, and the identification of Osiris and Horus as the rightful rulers, provided a rationale for pharaonic succession and portrayed the pharaohs as the upholders of order. At the same time, Osiris' death and rebirth were related to the Egyptian agricultural cycle, in which crops grew in the wake of the Nile inundation, and provided a template for the resurrection of human souls after death. Another important mythic motif was the journey of Ra through the Duat each night. In the course of this journey, Ra met with Osiris, who again acted as an agent of regeneration, so that his life was renewed. He also fought each night with Apep, a serpentine god representing chaos. The defeat of Apep and the meeting with Osiris ensured the rising of the sun the next morning, an event that represented rebirth and the victory of order over chaos.
 
 
 
 
Deities - The Egyptians believed that the phenomena of nature were divine forces in and of themselves.
These deified forces included the elements, animal characteristics, or abstract forces. The Egyptians believed in a pantheon of gods, which were involved in all aspects of nature and human society. Their religious practices were efforts to sustain and placate these phenomena and turn them to human advantage. This polytheistic system was very complex, as some deities were believed to exist in many different manifestations, and some had multiple mythological roles. Conversely, many natural forces, such as the sun, were associated with multiple deities. The diverse pantheon ranged from gods with vital roles in the universe to minor deities or "demons" with very limited or localized functions. It could include gods adopted from foreign cultures, and sometimes even humans: deceased pharaohs were believed to be divine, and occasionally, distinguished commoners such as Imhotep also became deified.
 
The depictions of the gods in art were not meant as literal representations of how the gods might appear if they were visible, as the gods' true natures were believed to be mysterious. Instead, these depictions gave recognizable forms to the abstract deities by using symbolic imagery to indicate each god's role in nature. Thus, for example, the funerary god Anubis was portrayed as a jackal, a creature whose scavenging habits threatened the preservation of the body, in an effort to counter this threat and employ it for protection. His black skin was symbolic of the color of mummified flesh and the fertile black soil that Egyptians saw as a symbol of resurrection. However, this iconography was not fixed, and many of the gods could be depicted in more than one form.
 
Many gods were associated with particular regions in Egypt where their cults were most important. However, these associations changed over time, and they did not necessarily mean that the god associated with a place had originated there. For instance, the god Monthu was the original patron of the city of Thebes. Over the course of the Middle Kingdom, however, he was displaced in that role by Amun, who may have arisen elsewhere. The national popularity and importance of individual gods fluctuated in a similar way.
 
 
 
Egyptian Gods and Goddesses
 
 
There were at least three separate cosmogenies in Egyptian mythology,
corresponding to at least two separate groups of worshippers.
 
The Ennead, in which Atum arose from the primordial waters (Neith), and masturbated to relieve his loneliness. His semen and breath became Tefnut (moisture) and Shu (dryness), respectively. From Shu and Tefnut, were born Geb (earth), and Nut (sky), who were born in a state of permanent copulation. Shu separated them, and their children were Ausare (Osiris; death), Set (desert), Aset (Isis; life), and Nebet Het (Nephthys; fertile land). Osiris and Isis were a couple, as were Nepthys and Set.
 
The Ogdoad, in which Ra arose, either in an egg, or a blue lotus, as a result of the creative interaction between the primordial forces of Nu/Naunet (water), Amun/Amunet (air), Kuk/Kauket (darkness), and Huh/Hauhet (eternity). Ra then created Hathor, his wife, with whom they had a son, Hor (Horus; in the form known as Horus the Elder), who was married to Isis.
This cosmogeny also includes Anupu (Anubis) as lord of the dead, amongst others.
 

Over time, the rival groups gradually merged, Ra and Atum were identified as the same god, making Atum's mysterious creation actually due to the Ogdoad, and Ra having the children Shu and Tefnut, etc. In consequence, Anubis was identified as a son of Osiris, as was Horus. Amun's role was later thought much greater, and for a time, he became chief god, although he eventually became considered a manifestation of Ra. For a time, Ra and Horus were identified as one another, and when the Aten monotheism was unsuccessfully introduced, it was Ra-Horus who was thought of as the Aten, and the consequent cosmogony this inspired. Later, Osiris' cult became more popular, and he became the main god, being identified as a form of Ptah. Eventually, all the gods were thought of as aspects of Osiris, Isis, Horus, or Set (who was by now a villain), indeed, Horus and Osiris had started to become thought of as the same god. Ptah eventually was identified as Osiris.

 

 

  

 

    

 

    

 

    

 

    

 

    

 

 


     

     
     
    Creational Myths
     

    In the beginning, before there was any land of Egypt, all was darkness,

    and there was nothing but a great waste of water called Nun.

    The power of Nun was such that there arose out of the darkness a great shining egg,

    and this was Re. He was all-powerful, and he could take many forms.

    His power and the secret of it lay in his hidden name;

    but if he spoke other names, that which he named came into being.

     

    "I am Khepera at the dawn, and Re at noon, and Tem in the evening," he said.

    And the sun rose and passed across the sky and set for the first time.

     

    Then he named Shu, and the first winds blew;

    he named Tefnut the spitter, and the first rain fell.

    Next he named Geb, and the earth came into being;

    he named the goddess Nut, and she was the sky arched over the earth

    with her feet on one horizon and her hands on the other; he named Hapi,

    and the great River Nile flowed through Egypt and made it fruitful.

     

    After this Re named all things that are upon the earth,

    and they grew. Last of all he named mankind,

    and there were men and women in the land of Egypt.

     

    Then Re took on the shape of a man and became the first Pharaoh,

    ruling over the whole country for thousands and thousands of years,

    and giving such harvests that for ever afterwards the Egyptians spoke of the good things

    "which happened in the time of Re".

     

    But, being in the form of a man, Re grew old. In time men no longer feared him or obeyed his laws.

    They laughed at him, saying: "Look at Re! His bones are like silver, his flesh like gold, his hair is the colour of lapis lazuli!"

     

    Re was angry when he heard this, and he was more angry still at the evil deeds which men were doing in disobedience to his laws. So he called together the gods whom he had made - Shu and Tefnut and Geb and Nut - and he also summoned Nun.

    Soon the gods gathered about Re in his Secret Place, and the goddesses also. But mankind knew nothing of what was happening, and continued to jeer at Re and to break his commandments. Then Re spoke to Nun before the assembled gods: "Eldest of the gods, you who made me; and you gods whom I have made: look upon mankind who came into being at a glance of my Eye. See how men plot against me; hear what they say of me; tell me what I should do to them.

    For I will not destroy mankind until I have heard what you advise."

     

    Then Nun said: "My son Re, the god greater than he who made him and mightier than those whom he has created,

    turn your mighty Eye upon them and send destruction upon them in the form of your daughter, the goddess Sekhmet."

     

    Re answered: "Even now fear is falling upon them and they are fleeing into the desert

    and hiding themselves in the mountains in terror at the sound of my voice."

     

    "Send against them the glance of your Eye in the form Sekhmet!"

    cried all the other gods and goddesses, bowing before Re until their foreheads touched the ground.

     

    So at the terrible glance from the Eye of Re his daughter Sekhmet came into being, the fiercest of all goddesses.

    Like a lion she rushed upon her prey, and her chief delight was in slaughter, and her pleasure was in blood.

     

    At the bidding of Re she came into Upper and Lower Egypt to slay those who had scorned and disobeyed him:

    she killed them among the mountains which lie on either side of the Nile, and down beside the river,

    and in the burning deserts. All whom she saw she slew, rejoicing in slaughter and the taste of blood.

     

    Presently Re looked out over the land and saw what Sekhmet had done.

    Then he called to her, saying: "Come, my daughter, and tell me how you have obeyed my commands."

     

    Sekhmet answered with the terrible voice of a lioness as she tears her prey:

    "By the life which you have given me, I have indeed done vengeance on mankind, and my heart rejoices."

     

    Now for many nights the Nile ran red with blood, and Sekhmet's feet were red

    as she went hither and thither through all the land of Egypt slaying and slaying.

     

    Presently Re looked out over the earth once more, and now his heart was stirred with pity for men,

    even though they had rebelled against him. But none could stop the cruel goddess Sekhmet,

    not even Re himself: she must cease from slaying of her own accord

    -and Re saw that this could only come about through cunning.

     

    So he gave his command: "Bring before me swift messengers who will run upon the earth as silently as shadows

    and with the speed of the storm winds." When these were brought he said to them:

    "Go as fast as you can up the Nile to where it flows fiercely over the rocks

    and among the islands of the First Cataract; go to the isle that is called Elephantine

    and bring from it a great store of the red ochre which is to be found there."

     

    The messengers sped on their way and returned with the blood-red ochre to Heliopolis,

    the city of Re where stand the stone obelisks with points of gold that are like fingers pointing to the sun.

    It was night when they came to the city, but all day the women of Heliopolis had been brewing beer as Re bade them.

     

    Re came to where the beer stood waiting in seven thousand jars,

    and the gods came with him to see how by his wisdom he would save mankind.

     

    "Mingle the red ochre of Elephantine with the barley-beer," said Re,

    and it was done, so that the beer gleamed red in the moonlight like the blood of men.

     

    "Now take it to the place where Sekhmet proposes to slay men when the sun rises," said Re.

    And while it was still night the seven thousand jars of beer were taken and poured out over the fields

    so that the ground was covered to the depth of nine inches -- three times the measure of the palm of a man's hand

    -with the strong beer, whose other name is "sleep-maker".

     

    When day came Sekhmet the terrible came also, licking her lips at the thought of the men whom she would slay.

    She found the place flooded and no living creature in sight; but she saw the beer which was the colour of blood,

    and she thought it was blood indeed -- the blood of those whom she had slain.

     

    Then she laughed with joy, and her laughter was like the roar of a lioness hungry for the kill.

    Thinking that it was indeed blood, she stooped and drank. Again and yet again she drank, laughing with delight;

    and the strength of the beer mounted to her brain, so that she could no longer slay.

     

    At last she came reeling back to where Re was waiting; that day she had not killed even a single man.

     

    Then Re said: "You come in peace, sweet one." And her name was changed to Hathor,

    and her nature was changed also to the sweetness of love and the strength of desire.

    And henceforth Hathor laid low men and women only with the great power of love.

    But for ever after her priestesses drank in her honour of the beer of Heliopolis

    coloured with the red ochre of Elephantine when they celebrated her festival each New Year.

     

    So mankind was saved, and Re continued to rule old though he was.

    But the time was drawing near when he must leave the earth to reign for ever in the heavens,

    letting the younger gods rule in his place. For dwelling in the form of a man, of a Pharaoh of Egypt,

    Re was losing his wisdom; yet he continued to reign, and no one could take his power from him,

    since that power dwelt in his secret name which none knew but himself.

    If only anyone could discover his Name of Power, Re would reign no longer on earth;

    but only by magic arts was this possible.

    Geb and Nut had children: these were the younger gods whose day had come to rule,

    and their names were Osiris and Isis, Nephthys and Seth. Of these Isis was the wisest:

    she was cleverer than a million men, her knowledge was greater than that of a million of the noble dead.

    She knew all things in heaven and earth, except only for the Secret Name of Re,

    and that she now set herself to learn by guile.

    Now Re was growing older every day. As he passed across the land of Egypt his head shook from side to side with age,

    his jaw trembled, and he dribbled at the mouth as do the very old among men. As his spittle fell upon the ground it made mud,

    and this Isis took in her hands and kneaded together as if it had been dough. Then she formed it into the shape of a serpent,

    making the first cobra -- the uraeus, which ever after was the symbol of royalty worn by Pharaoh and his queen.

    Isis placed the first cobra in the dust of the road by which Re passed each day as he went through his two kingdoms

    of Upper and Lower Egypt. As Re passed by the cobra bit him and then vanished into the grass.

    But the venom of its bite coursed through his veins, and for a while Re was speechless,

    save for one great cry of pain which rang across the earth from the eastern to the western horizon.

    The gods who followed him crowded round, asking: "What is it? What ails you?"

    But he could find no words; his lips trembled and he shuddered in all his limbs,

    while the poison spread over his body as the Nile spreads over Egypt at the inundation.

    When at last he could speak, Re said: "Help me, you whom I have made. Something has hurt me, and I do not know what it is.

    I created all things, yet this thing I did not make. It is a pain such as I have never known before, and no other pain is equal to it.

    Yet who can hurt me?-for none knows my Secret Name which is hidden in my heart, giving me all power and guarding me

    against the magic of both wizard and witch. Nevertheless as I passed through the world which I have created, through

    the two lands that are my special care, something stung me. It is like fire, yet is not fire; it is like water and not water.

    I burn and I shiver, while all my limbs tremble. So call before me all the gods who have skill in healing

    and knowledge of magic, and wisdom that reaches to the heavens."

     

    Then all the gods came to Re, weeping and lamenting at the terrible thing which had befallen him.

    With them came Isis, the healer, the queen of magic, who breathes the breath of life

    and knows words to revive those who are dying. And she said: "What is it, divine father?

    Has a snake bitten you. Has a creature of your own creating lifted up its head against you?

    I will drive it out by the magic that is mine, and make it tremble and fall down before your glory."

     

    "I went by the usual way through my two lands of Egypt," answered Re, "for I wished to look upon all that I had made.

    And as I went I was bitten by a snake which I did not see -- a snake that, I had not created.

    Now I burn as if with fire and shiver as if my veins were filled with water, and the sweat

    runs down my face it runs down the faces of men on the hottest days of summer."

     

    "Tell me your Secret Name." said Isis in a sweet, soothing voice.

    "Tell it me, divine father; for only by speaking your name in my spells can I cure you."

     

    Then Re spoke the many names that were his: "I am Maker Heaven and Earth."

    he said. "I am Builder of the Mountains. I am Source of the Waters throughout all the world.

    I am Light and Darkness. I am Creator of the Great River of Egypt.

    I am the Kindler of the Fire that burns in the sky; yes, I am Khepera in the morning,

    Re at the noontide, and Tum in the evening."

     

    But Isis said never a word, and the poison had its way in the veins of Re.

    For she knew that he had told her only the names which all men knew,

    and that his Secret Name, the Name of Power, still lay hidden in his heart.

     

    At last she said: "You know well that the name which I need to learn is not among those which you have spoken.

    Come, tell me the Secret Name; for if you do the poison will come forth and you will have an end of pain."

     

    The poison burned with a great burning, more powerful than any flame of fire,

    and Re cried out at last: "Let the Name of Power pass from my heart into the heart of Isis!

    But before it does, swear to me that you will tell it to no other save only the son whom you will have,

    whose name shall be Horus. And bind him first with such an oath

    that the name will remain with him and be passed on to no other gods or men."

     

    Isis the great magician swore the oath,

    and the knowledge of the Name of Power passed from the heart of Re into hers.

    Then she said: "By the name which I know, let the poison go from Re for ever!"

     

    So it passed from him and he had peace.

    But he reigned upon earth no longer.

    Instead he took his place in the high heavens,

    traveling each day across the sky in the likeness of the sun itself,

    and by night crossing the underworld of Amenti in the Boat of Re

    and passing through the twelve divisions of Duat where many dangers lurk.

     

    Yet Re passes safely, and with him he takes those souls of the dead who know all the charms and prayers

    and words that must be said. And so that a man might not go unprepared for his voyage in the Boat of Re,

    the Egyptians painted all the scenes of that journey on the walls of the tombs of the Pharaohs,

    with all the knowledge that was written in The Book of the Dead,

    of which a copy was buried in the grave of lesser men

    so that they too might read and come safely

    to the land beyond the west where the dead dwell.

     

     

     

     

     

     

         

     

     

       

     

       

     

       

     

     

    Ancient Egyptian Religion

     

    Afterlife, Sarcophagi, Burial Masks

     

    Alchemy, Science

     

    Ancient Aircraft

     

    Ancient Books of the Underworld

     

    Amduat - The Book of the Secret Chamber

     

    Pyramid Texts

     

    The Book of the Dead - The Book of Coming [or Going] Forth By Day

     

    Coffin Text - The Book of Two Ways

     

    The Book of Caverns

     

    The Book of Gates

     

    Litany of Re

     

    Books of the Heavens

     

    The Book of the Heavenly (Celestial) Cow

     

    Ankh

     

    Armana Tablet

     

    Art and Architecture

     

    Astrology, Ptolemy, Aliens Connections to Sirius and Orion

     

    Bahariya, Valley of the Golden Mummies

     

    Barge (Boats) in Ancient Egypt

     

    Calendars

     

    Clocks

     

    Creation Myth

     

    Djed Pillar

     

    Double-Feathered Crowns

     

    Dynasties

     

    Akhenaten

     

    Nefertiti

     

    Hatshepsut

     

    Manetho. Kings List

     

    Turin King List, Turin Royal Canon

    Egyptian Dream Scrying

     

    Flooding of the Nile

     

    History, Chronology

     

    Gantenbrink's Door

     

    Gods and Goddesses

     

    Ogdoad

     

    Ennead

     

    Language

     

    Link With Australia, Grand Canyon, Decalogue

     

    Medicine, Smith Papyrus, Ebers Papyrus

     

    Moses

     

    Ten Commandments of Moses

     

    Mystery Schools

     

    Mythology

     

    News Articles

     

    Nubai

     

    Oxyrhynchus

     

    Palermo Stone

     

    Phaistos Disc

     

    Priests, Priestesses, Initiation

     

    Pyramids

     

    Religion

     

    Rosetta Stone

     

    Scarab

     

    Social System

     

    Spinx

     

    Sphinx Breastplate

     

    Symbols and Their Meanings

     

    Tattoo

     

    Temples

     

    King Tutankhamen

     

    Trees in Ancient Egypt

     

    Uraeus

     

    Valley of the Kings

     

    Valley of the Queens

     

    Women

     

    Writing, Hieroglyphs


    The 12 Pyramids of Thoth

     

     
     
     
     
     
    EGYPT
     
    CREATION BY COUNTRIES INDEX